The Oracle vs SAP War – Really?

Seriously now – I know I work for SAP, but since a thousand years ago I was a JDE consultant I like to think I have a fairly objective view of the world of ERP. I see an awful lot of analysts (who quite frankly – have probably never worked a day in their life in the “trenches” so to speak) spouting off about Oracle taking over from SAP as the market leader, why SAP should be worried, and blah blah.

Newsflash. SAP is not worried. This isn’t arrogance – it’s pure pragmatism. Oracle is years, no really, years behind SAP in the areas that matter.

Fusion Applications was announced in Q1 2006. Understand that since Oracle buys it’s software rather than growing organically (80/20 in my estimation) – integration and integrated applications are absolutely crucial to the average CIO. The sell from Oracle is that they are now a “one stop shop” able to supply and fully integrate the entire suite of enterprise applications. In Q1 2006 SAP already had a maturing Integration stack called NetWeaver.

SAP have implemented thousands of NetWeaver applications with some fairly heavy integration. Users literally could not care less where their data resides or their applications reside. Everything is fully and robustly integrated. Oracle have yet to deliver the first generation of Fusion Applications http://www.cio.com/article/452717/Oracle_Fusion_Applications_Is_Delivery_Too_Little_Too_Late_or_Smart_Strategy_ and now they are pitching 2010.

SAP is on the 5th Generation NetWeaver with some very well integrated apps and some mature middleware. Even the small amount of aquisitions that have taken place have now been integrated (Business Objects for example) and new aquisitions (BPC from Outlooksoft) will be integrated fully in their next release.

So – SAP has very little to worry about. Honestly if I was a CEO and my CIO told me he was going Oracle, I would ask him to consider his prospects at another firm.  I suppose analysts have to justify their existence by saying something, and I’m sure Oracle has very clever sales people to sway their opinion. The facts, however, speak for themselves.

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